Nothing can increase your monthly utility costs a quickly as heating and cooling. A smart thermostat will help you to efficiently regulate a building’s temperature, but only if you can control the thermostat. For commercial buildings, schools, apartment buildings, and families with kids, a thermostat guard enables you to control the temperature. With a properly installed lock box, you won’t have to worry about anyone else cranking up the heat or air conditioning beyond reason. This article will walk you through the steps about how to choose and install a thermostat lock.

Choosing the Right Thermostat Lock Box

First, if you have a smart thermostat, you should check whether it has any virtual lock options. You may be able to set a password so that only approved people can change the temperature. If not, you’ll need a physical thermostat cover. You have a couple of options for the guard material. Most thermostat guards come in plastic. These are affordable, durable, and usually transparent so that you can view the thermostat without removing the cover. Your other option is a metal lock box. These are extremely durable, so they’re good for locations where you’re worried about tampering. The downside is they don’t enable you to view the thermostat without unlocking it, and if placed in the sun, they can get warm. After you’ve chosen the type of thermostat cover you want, make sure you measure your thermostat (and double check!) so you can choose one with the right dimensions. The next step is installing the thermostat guard.

What You Need to Install a Thermostat Guard

Installing the thermostat guard is relatively simple and will probably only use tools you have on hand. In addition to the cover itself, you’ll need:

  • Pencil
  • Drill
  • Wall plugs
  • Screws
  • Screwdriver

How to Install Your Thermostat Lock Box

It takes just a few steps to install your new thermostat lock.

  1. Position the lock box back plate over the thermostat and use a pencil to mark where the drill holes will go
  2. Use a drill to drill holes at each of these marks
  3. Insert wall plugs
  4. Screw the back plate into the wall
  5. Attach the front of the lock box and lock it closed

Once your thermostat guard is in place, all you need to do is find a safe place to keep your key and make sure you don’t lose it. As long as your thermostat lock guard is in place, you can look forward to a more efficient building and lower utility costs.